Just had an appointment with the Product Doctor

@Documentally aka Christian Payne aka Our Man Inside – our first happy customer at Over The Air Conference!  Key insight here was to consider who your users / addressable market think you are and what you do,  not who you think you are. His comments on Posterous are:

“…Massive thanks to @Jewl and @Katzstar for giving me therapy. The things I didn’t know about what it is I do & how I could do it better…”

Dr Katrina listens for signs of life!

 

“Just because you can doesn’t mean you should”

A few months ago, I was talking to a friend about his new B2B product which was in the process of being prototyped.  The words that tripped out were “Just because you can doesn’t mean you should”.

The product was being centred around insights gathered by the CEO through general conversations with potential end users.  My concerns with this were:

  • The potential end users were not budget holders and therefore could not eventually make the decision to purchase the new product.  So in this case, research around the benefits of the product should be also carried out with budget holders – seeing if there is a case to make their organisation more efficient / productive / profitable as a result of adopting this product.
  • The potential end users had genuine pain points that needed solutions, but the prototype was a number of months down the line and no one had been back to those potential end users to see if the solution being developed was addressing their need. As I always say, you don’t need to wait for a prototype to continue your dialogue with users. You can talk about what they would want the product do to and why – build up the bank of “user stories” (Scrum reference) and get those prioritised before you begin your build.
  • The CEO may well not be the best person to talk to end users. Classically CEOs are strong characters; leaders who are passionate about their product.  An end user may well not be comfortable to say “no” to a person like this!  It takes certain personality traits and practice to be good at gathering user insight.

The very talented developer was building up the prototype from sketchy top line requirements written by the CEO. He was injecting a large dose of filling in the many blanks with clever code that enabled the product to do all sorts of things that had never been done before.  But was this functionality that the user wanted and the budget holders would agree to buy? Nobody knew.

Diving in to the feasibility (technical capability), working up the viability (scalability) and then establishing desirability (the user need) is the trap.  This is how many companies end up with a product that may technically work well but does hit the sweet spot with users.  They then often then find that they are continually customising the product for individual clients, which is not cost effective and not scalable.  Another classic result of this approach is feature overload – features built in to a product that are never used – again resulting in wasted resource.  This model needs to be reversed and you need to start first with desirability.

Point made?!

Co-Creation: Involve Youth in The Process

I was asked by Graham Brown of Mobile Youth to give an Expert Interview around the subject of youth sourcing. I hope you enjoy it!

“…We’re talking to Julia about how to engage youth within the product development process. Can big mobile brands increase the relevance and hit rates of their products by incorporating the target market into the idea generation and message shaping? Julia thinks so. We find out more about how co-creating innovation with youth is not only possible but vital to product relevance.

Watch the video to answer these questions:

* How can large organizations conduct better youth insights?
* How should you build youth panels for companies or conferences?
* What are the business benefits of involving youth in product development?…”

Brixvill – An experimental platform for young people

Back in August 2009, I spotted a posting on the online Space Makers Network from a Lambeth Council officer who was interested in doing something creative with empty shops.  I grabbed Dougald Hine, the founder of Space Makers, and went down to meet him.  That was how we came to be introduced and was introduced to the property owners of Brixton Village indoor market (formerly Granville Arcade) who had 20 empty units that they were struggling to rent.

The first time we visited the market I broke out in goosebumps as my body tingled with possibilities and that was how I became the Project Director, working with Space Makers to bring this wonderful space back to life along with an equally wonderful and inspiring team – Katrina Damianou and Flora Gordon.

left to right - Katrina, me and Flora

What an incredible atmosphere created by the beauty of the 1930s build and the echoes of its glory days, with the sharp contrast between the empty parts of the market vs the busy parts that bustled with shops selling meat, fish, toiletries, wigs, specialist grocers and restaurants.  From the start, it was important to us to make sure that the existing tenants would also benefit from the additional footfall that the new projects would bring.

First, a competition for 3 months rent free was launched at a Space Exploration Night in November ’09 – 5 applications for every available space were received and by mid December the first tranche of creative, community and enterprising projects were up and running. There have been a series of temporary and test trade projects in the units ever since and 9 months later all of 20 the empty units have been permanently rented – success!

Space Exploration Night - mid November 2009. (left to right) Gail Rowe of Lambeth Council; Dan Thompson founder of the Empty Shops Network, Steph Butcher - the fabulous Brixton Town Centre Director, Matt Western of Space Makers, Dougald Hine founder of Space Makers, Me addressing the 350 strong crowd, Mike, Nicola & Neil of LAP - the market's owners. (Thanks to Sara Haq for photo).

This project was always about the longer term sustainability of the market and bringing it back to its former glory as a key destination for the communit. The vision was to make it not just a home for trade, but also a place to see performance – dance, music, theatre and a place to interact – meet old friends and make new ones – whilst taking part in all kinds of activities. Thus the program of event-based Saturdays began in January. With huge buy-in from the community, both as visitors and contributors, and the need to drive more footfall for the new projects, late Thursdays were launched in April.

What all of these youth projects had in common was:

  • The energy and enthusiasm of the young people involved.  Another re-buff to the media image of students as moody, ungrateful and reckless! On this project I have met some incredibly bright, upbeat young people that have been appreciative of the opportunities that this has offered them and they have been the most responsible tenants!
  • They were prepared to take risks and step in the unknown – an opportunity that is not offered to them in the formal educational structure.  With my background steeped in innovation, we have been clear that this project does not know failure – only learning opportunities.  I have found that with this approach and a lack of formal structure, people have been able to unleash their true creativity in a safe environment.
  • They use social media like they were brought up with it (well they almost were) and are incredibly good at activating their networks to drive visitors to their projects, which also benefits the overall market project. They also use more traditional media, creating posters and some going out and about flyering the local area and their colleges.  Many also attracted press to their projects.
  • They also showed a strong social mindedness, wanting to be part of this larger project to re-establish the market, often forming strong relationships with other traders and taking part in overall market activities.

This is a showcase of what happens when Digital Youth are given a real life opportunity.

1. Write by Numbers – Ovid Reworked

A young collective of writers, actors and designers brought the first theatre project to the market in an open fronted unit. They challenge young writers, performers and theatre makers to experiment with all the ways it is possible to make, create and produce theatre. This was their first production as a group; they attracted over 300 people in 2 weeks and and media attention including an article in The Sunday Times. They achieved this not only through sheer hard work, but effective use of social media, online project documentation, the ability to engage their networks and to bring in locals by promoting out and about with flyers.   Spring-boarding from this success, they continue to put on productions and are now recruiting for project managers!

2. Ash Finch – a 2nd Year photography student from London South Bank University

Ash carried out his work placement in the early months of the project and his photographs were published by Time Out and the Sunday Times.

“…I learnt first hand how organisations such as Space Makers rely on networking and teamwork to produce the end results such as Brixton Village. I think  that more work goes into organising sites such as these than people realise. Also photography wise the project gave me the national exposure of having my work printed which was a great opportunity, and also the knowledge that my images where helping the community and local business by hopefully attracting more trade and visitors to the site, emphasising what a powerful tool photography can be…”
3. Market Stall Trading Experience, YE London

Over 2 weeks, approximately 25 young people from Lambeth participated in a 4 day course delivered by Young Enterprise London to learn the basics of setting up and running a business.  They learned about everything from marketing and branding to product development and budgeting.  Each group designed and made key rings and the course culminated with an opportunity to sell their products to members of the public at Brixton Village Market.
“…We had a very successful time, with both teams selling all their stock within an hour and a half of arrival. The young people learned a lot about customer services and sales techniques and definitely seemed to enjoy the experience…” Rosalind Moody from Young Enterprise London.

4. Work Experience, London Creative Labs

Rashida and her brother Hassan, were introduced to the project by Sofia Bustamente of London Creative Labs.  Sofia works in Brixton with the objective of job creation – by the community and for the community. She finds dis-enfranchised people and helps them work on their bigger dreams working through practical steps to get them there. So she set up work placements with Sweet Tooth, the sweet shop, and Cornercopia, a locally sourced restaurant/deli. This enabled both the siblings to build on their CV and find jobs using what they learned about customer service and retail.

5. Wake Up Campaign – Viviane Williams, a student from Goldsmiths.

“…Being given the opportunity to have a pop up in Brixton Village Market has allowed me to test my ideas/vision to the public, this has been rewarding, insightful and has given me more confidence to take risks, a true entrepreneurial attribute to test for a viable venture. By testing my vision, I have interacted with the local community and have formed great relationships. Through this, I have developed my social enterprise ‘Wakeup campaign‘ – stimulating people’s consciousness with the power of design such as role play – in this case as African Kings and Queens – to help bring social change. I have now won a few awards on behalf of the business and I feel this would have not been achievable without the platform of showcasing the idea in Brixton Village Market’…”  Viviane Williams.

6. Camberwell Arts College Students

Artinavan were the first group in – they had been one of the successful applicants for the initial 3 months rent free. Artinavan ran a series of incredible exhibitions that changed every few weeks.  Positioned at a busy junction in the market surrounded by grocers, fishmongers and meat stalls, they played a key role in connecting the new projects with the existing traders in the market through their creative work.

One of my favourite stories is the photo booth that they set up where they printed out about 2 foot high worth of photos of the traders and market visitors that they had taken during that particular activity and within 3 weeks, there were only a handful of photos left.  It gave me a clear indication that all of those people had returned to the market and collected their photo.  This is the story that I tell to show that a large number of people that visit the market enjoy the experience so much that they come back.  They further showed how photographs can play a significant role in breaking down barriers and starting conversations.

I do encourage you to look at their blog that shows film, photographs and explanations of the projects.  They also received coverage in The Independent.  They were something really special.  Here is what Sean Andre Millington has said about his time: “‘…On our many variations on using the space that was offered to us in Brixton village market allowed the the collective to really explore the possibilities of producing art without the permissible pressures that are ever imposed within the art world, we were able to produce and present art that directly engaged with the vibrancy of the area and the freedom to create beyond the white walls of a gallery. We were able to view the nature of our interactive installations engage with the whole market, where the whole of the market became the gallery and our shop a painting hanging on its wall…”

Comic Assault – Charlie Cameron

Following Artinavan’s  success, we have had a series of Camberwell Student projects including Comic Assault, where a group of arts students produced and sold their Comic. It was part of their course syllabus to set up an event outside of the college. “…Setting up the show to having the opening night it has given us a huge confidence boost to go out and do more of the same…”

Alter Ego, Philippe Fenner

An exhibition created by the 2nd year Camberwell Illustration group - www.alteregodraw.com. This exhibition exclusively comprised work by the public and not just art students.  It is a ‘live exhibition’ as the entrance fee was visitors drawing their alter ego.

“…Our show at the Brixton Village had a perfect setting. We found that there is a dormant inner creative force behind everyone’s exteriors and that the passion for drawing does not die at the age of ten, it is merely subdued until a project like our own released it, if only for five minutes. We experienced a show that we’d always wanted to see; un-snobbish, approachable, fun and full of unlikely heroes; from enforcers of southbank patrol creating existential mind-maps to East-End club owners with pink hats drawing themselves how they’d like to be seen. We experienced also a show that would not have been possible if the group hadn’t created a cohesive idea which all of us had an input in…”

7. Baytree Centre

Local charity, The Baytree Centre, got the forecourt dancing one Thursday afternoon with their 8 – 13 year old dance troop. They presented some routines and workouts to passersby and encouraged everyone to join in. The Baytree Centre is 5 minute walk from the market. This was the upshot of my just turning up for an uninvited chat!

“…The girls love to perform and being able to involve onlookers and teach them what they’ve been learning made it extra special. The girls got to share what they learnt and demonstrate their talent in an informal and friendly environment…”  Suzy Holloway

Closing Comments

In this post I have attempted to show how young people will pro-actively take up opportunities that we can offer them to gain real life learning experiences and how they use them to build up their own portfolio.  It gives more fodder to challenge the negative media perception of teens and students. You can see how they use social media effectively to mobilise and extend their networks.  I hope that it encourages you to create platforms for young people to engage with your projects and how doing so can also benefit your project and business objectives.

Thanks to Andy Broomfield and Ash Finch for the majority of the photos!

Why I developed my digital youth business

This interview was carried out for Heroes of the Mobile Screen (HOTMS) Conference December 09 by Peggy Ann Salz. I talk about how and why I bring young people and business together. So, if you prefer to listen rather than read – click here, or go here http://bit.ly/5HO0cq, scroll down and sit back!

Safety : Young People in Virtual Environments

Based on my experience working with virtual online community spaces for young people, I was asked to be on a panel at Professor Richard Bartle’s Protecting and Engaging Kids in Virtual Spaces Forum, October, 2009. Here are my thoughts from the event:

1. Useful stats about young people’s online usage
Marc Goodchilld from the BBC quoted some really useful stats from Childwise Report 2009. These stats relate to 5 – 16 year olds in the UK
• 87% go online
• 55% own computer
• 37% access in own room
• 33% of 9-10 year olds go online – that increases to 59% for the 11 – 12 year olds due mainly to them being driven online to do their homework.

2. Difficulties with engaging parents in the online safety of their children
The BBC children’s sites are one of the most popular sites in the UK and parents associate high levels of trust that it is safe and appropriate. However, there is evidence to suggest that many parents do not know what else their children are doing online. The Byron report suggests three areas for concern: inappropriate content; contact and conduct. There were some surprisingly low stats measuring parental concern around these areas. As “digital immigrants”, the parents simply do not have the time and in a lot of cases, the digital skills to be able to follow and monitor their children online.

There is a cry from many groups that parents should be educated to help their children understand what steps they should take to ensure that their children are safe online. There is a period of 8 – 10 years where these education programs are important as the next generation of parents will be digitally literate themselves – digital natives. There were some good examples of active education cited such as Sky who teach parents how to use pin locks when they install their services in the home.

As is the nature of technological innovation, there are continuous new developments that present both further ways to protect children online as well as further threats to child safety. For example, enabling live in game real time voice chat (through VoIP) presents moderation issues as it is both real time and difficult from a scalability point of view to support.

I was particularly concerned to hear about the “jigsaw effect” where it is easy to piece together what children have said in different message boards on different sites and for the unsavoury elements in society to build up quite a full picture of an individual.

3. Let’s engage young people to help us solve these safety issues
My passion is to engage users in designing solutions to the challenges that we face. Children are the digital natives – they understand what they do online better than the older generation that are making and implementing the policies. I talked about my tried and tested ways of engaging users that you can read about on the rest of my blog.

Tamara Littleton, who founded eModeration embraced these ideas around engaging users –
“The most crucial thing we can do to improve internet safety and enjoyment is education of the young users. Better than a purely didactic process which may be rejected by teenagers, is peer-to-peer leadership/mentoring, and input from the target group themselves as to what they want to learn and how it should be taught.”

Here is a picture of my panel – Kevin Holloway from Finesse Management, lil ol me and Tamara Littleton from eModeration.
New 357
Engaging users also in the implementation of safety education, for example, giving them jobs in the virtual environment to help self-police, also provides good experience for them to build up a CV style portfolio and from a business point of view, is likely to create more user loyalty from those involved. It echoes the e-bay model of self-policing taken to a younger audience.

My view was also supported by information from Marc Goodchild at the BBC, where he pointed out that children as young as 10 have developed the abilities to discern malicious behaviour and they are able to take the necessary steps that a publisher provides them to report the incident.

Oisin Lunny from Sulake that own Habbo talked about some great examples of campaigns where it became cool to participate and spread the word – such as their Childline campaign, where users proudly collected and wore their badges. With the younger sites, such as the BBC, it is easier to craft engaging sites where the real time elements can be limited as they theorise that the user experience is more about enjoying activities online, playing together that may not require users to be able to communicate with each other in a free text live format.

4. Be open, honest and give young people the respect of being savvy!
Having worked with many young people, I also reinforced the message that young people are savvy and should be given the respect of open and honest communication from the site publishers. Creativity is necessary in getting safety messages delivered. I have found time over that young people do not sit and read text, however, if messages can be integrated in to the game play, perhaps using existing reward structures within virtual environments to incentivise safe behaviour and good active policing then like the Childline campaign in Habbo, users will help publishers to get their message across. To my point about user engagement, Habbo have had great success from their “Idea Agency” where they launched a virtual ad agency in Habbo, setting users challenges on how best to run campaigns in the Habbo environment – designed by users.

5. Recognise the power of Virtual Environments for their educational properties
The other topic that I raised was that we should recognise the educational properties of virtual environments. Futurebrand in a report associated with Becta, identified four ways that engagement in virtual environments can be educational:

1. Virtual environments are a persuasive medium that can affect young people’s thinking providing positive opportunities to inform young people about important contemporary issues such as injustice and the consequences of ideological conflict.
2. The Constructionist theory is that children’s development takes place through participation in a social world and interaction with people, events and objects. These are ideal platforms for young people to try out ideas, make decision, communicate with others and explore or make new worlds. It is active and participative rather than passive and merely receptive.
3. They enable us to create environments for authentic activity –learning occurs most successfully when it take place in authentic contexts. For example, learn about a historical period by exploring and interacting in a virtual environment that has re-created it. They also have to learn to deal with many inputs and outputs at the same time, collaborate with other players to take risks and experience failure in a safe environment. Some sites allow learners to adopt the identities and practices of professional innovators in a variety of fields. These are also the sorts of skills that will equip the younger generation for the 21st century and their work lives.
4. Media Literacy learning is often talked about as a positive educational take out from engagement with virtual environments. The futurebrand report also frames this excellently, referring to
a). Critical Consumption
The ability of learners to be able to read and produce media – to understand the politics – how media are produced, for what purposes and to what effects – how media organisations operate, how audiences receive and respond to different media and how the exchange between media produces and consumers impacts on social relations and culture
b). Creative Production
Young people become the designers and creators of media. They learn by constructing media, and having to consider design, distribution, representation and audience. Media literacy is important across the board not just for those in media studies.

Carpets or Virtual World?

At one school session using a real-life case study about a teenage virtual world, the business challenge for the students was to define an engaging product feature that the company should work on next.

One bright spark said, “Hang on a minute. I just gave you a good idea. If they decide to do my idea, then I should get paid for that.” I asked him whether he would rather do a case study about carpet manufacturing (the previous year’s exercise in which I was not involved) or do this year’s study on a product that they were really interested in? After processing, he nodded indicating he knew he got a much better deal this year.

There is no doubt that bringing a real-life case study on the cutting edge of digital innovation plays a large part toward engaging a group of teens. You should have seen the students’ fascination when talking through the business model at the start!

A great user-designed proposition

This story occurred when I was taking real-life case studies to schools. The product was a set of sounds that a user could download to their mobile and insert into phone conversations.

The company had various prototypes set up such as a fart machine, each fart was a different type (I will let you imagine that!). The teens absolutely hated the farts apparently finding them boring and obvious.

Off they went into groups where I lead them through the innovation cycle, brainstorming ideas and deciding which idea to prototype. I encouraged one particular group to think about how they could use sound functionality in a truly useful way.

The best idea that surfaced was a package of sounds for excuses. The user scenarios they described included: running late for school, being late home keeping parents waiting up and so on. The sounds they suggested offering included: busy road sounds with engines and sirens to clearly represent being stuck in traffic; doctors surgery sounds, “Mr. Smith to see Dr. Jones in Room 1, up the stairs to your left.”

Lateral, practical and lots of nodding heads in the classroom – they wished it was available now.

Ordinarily the most disruptive member of the class

In the very early days when volunteering in schools, I used a fictitious case study about a chocolate manufacturer who had made too many chocolates in the run up to Valentines Day. The students’ task was to generate some ideas of how they could package and sell the overrun of chocolate.

I started by asking the class who they thought the chocolate manufacturers were targeting, “What chocolates do you see when you walk into a news agent around Valentines Day?” They responded that the chocolate offerings were very girly and old-fashioned and seemed to be marketed for older women. Thus began a dialogue about market segmentation.

The student ordinarily the most disruptive member of the class said, “Can I make a chocolate box for the gays?” My eyes lit up. This was a good example of an under-served market.and I explained the value of “the pink pound.” Master Disruptive could not believe that he was not thrown out of class and he seemed chuffed to be commended on his idea. It felt as if praise was a stranger to him.

His team created a chocolate box with a rather cheeky gimmick and slogan to sell the chocolates to “the pink pound” market. Another group chose to market to the single mother market. They pondered, “I would love to give my mother chocolates on Valentines Day becuase I love her.” They produced a “For my mum on Valentines” offering.

Youth Experience

Between the ages of 13 to 18 years old, I was a youth leader in an international organisation. I designed, delivered and co-ordinated sessions and conventions as well as provided coaching for emerging leaders.

When I started work at 21, I already had well-developed public speaking, presentation, leadership, team and communication skills. I was hired as a team manager in my first role and continued to coach many individuals and teams to high performance throughout my career. I have always held leadership roles and have worked
cross functionally and at the board level. From my own experience, I understand the huge value in giving students the opportunity to practice and develop these skills from a young age.

Throughout my career, I have worked with youth products from the launch of One2One / T-Mobile to the areas of Mobile Content and other online youth offerings. I have managed and driven innovation for £350m product portfolios such as Mobile Messaging and have consulted with many companies in the digital space. My 12 years at One2One / T-Mobile saw me promoted to a new role each year. I also spent 3 years as Director of Product and User Insights for a popular teenage avatar / virtual world site called WeeWorld. My special approach has always been to be both end user and revenue centric.

I have been running workshops in schools for over 8 years, starting as a volunteer in Hertfordshire schools when I was at T-Mobile. I have worked with over 10 schools across Herts and London and with teacher groups including the Heads of Business Studies in London.

I have also started conversations about the new Diplomas and how to integrate “Real Work Environments” in to the various programs. I have also been exploring ideas around Education 2.0 with sites such as http://www.teachable.net and the educational properties of virtual world environments.